7/4/15

Linking Blogger and Facebook

Today I learned how to link my blog (Shelf Elf News) on Blogger to my Facebook page using IFTTT (https://ifttt.com). Now when I post to my blog you will see it on my Facebook page. It took about five minutes.

6/7/15

Lesson Plans 6/8/15 - 6/12/15

Monday: K-5: Computer Madness
Tuesday: Field Day
Wednesday: Talent Show (last day for students)
Thursday: Collect items from teachers, maybe dinner in Half Moon Bay, Ca
Friday: Sleep in ... go to "Apple Fritters" for brunch

5/8/15

Lesson Plans 5/26-6/05

K-5: Library Review with the movie: The Pagemaster

Library standards: 4.1.b Choose reading from a variety of genres (e.g., drama, fable, fairy tale, fantasy, folklore, essay, speech). 4.3 Appreciate and respond to creative expressions of information:a. Understand that genre is a term that describes types of literary works that are similar (e.g., drama, fable, fairy tale, fantasy, folklore, essay, speech).



Lesson Plans: 5/18-5/22

ALL student library books are due, all work due.
K-2: As illustrators students will make a Weather Picture Encyclopedia
Grade 3-5: Day 6: Using Google Sheets for a Readers Theater Script

5/6/15

Librarians Lead the Way in EdTech by Shannon Mersand

Librarians Lead the Way in EdTech 
by Shannon Mersand

April is School Library Month, and this year’s theme is “Your School Library: Where Learning Never Ends.” No tag line could be truer. Librarians are lifelong learners by nature. Whether it is the newest educational theory, the latest research methods, or the newest educational technology push, librarians love to learn and share new things.

When considering a new educational technology initiative, such as purchasing Chromebooks, going BYOD, or choosing educational software, districts often consider many things, including cost, return on investment, effectiveness, and necessary professional development. But one thing they may not consider is their librarian.
Libraries and librarians are at the forefront and often the hub of the school. They are a community resource, a public face, a service profession, a helping hand, relationship builders, collaborators, and educational technology leaders. Librarians of 2015 are not the same librarians you remember from 1985. They still order books and teach research skills, but it is very rare to hear them shushing students, or hiding meekly behind the stacks. Librarians wear a number of hats and information literacy is closely tied to educational technology.
“Research” skills have evolved rapidly in the last 20 years and much of that evolution is because of educational technology. “The role of the librarian continues to evolve, and technology is the driver behind that. This group represents an essential voice within the national and international edtech and connected learning conversation,” says Marshal Conley, senior consultant, American Institutes for Research. When computers first made their way into schools, they were often found in the library. One computer terminal, possibly with dial-up Internet access, served an entire school. Librarians sought out ways to utilize those computers to increase student achievement. Fast forward to today: libraries are filled with desktop computers, laptops, tablets, Chromebooks, ebooks, Web 2.0 tools, databases, and maker spaces. “The current jobs of librarians are not only enhanced by edtech, they depend on it. The best in the library field are not only utilizing edtech, but they are the experts in the field,” says Sudah Narsipur, school media specialist at the Ossining High School in NY. We surveyed 43 librarians to gauge their daily technology use.

More than 75% of the librarians surveyed estimated that they spend 50% or more of their day working directly with students, teachers, and technology. “Librarians have worked with and through educational technology for years—they have just moved from projectors and microfilm to Kindles and online databases.” says Krista, an LMS administrator in Denver, CO. Some would argue that you can’t have technology without the librarians.
Having technology and knowing how to effectively integrate it into the curriculum are two different things. A school can purchase the latest and greatest technology, but without someone on the receiving end knowing what to do with it, it becomes an expensive dust collector, much like microfilm. Marifran DeMaine, a school media specialist at Putnam Valley High School in New York reminds us that librarians are “information experts who have the unique capacity to tie edtech meaningfully to classroom instruction and student achievement.” Coupled with the fact that librarians are connected to everyone and everything, you create a perfect storm. “Librarians cross all content area lines and are in a unique position to support and share tech initiatives in many different capacities,” says Sherry Fisher, an ELA teacher at Webutuck High School in New York.
Librarians are often a known face in a school. “They are often on the front lines handling the tech with students and generally know about what tech is out there or soon to be out there. The most professional [librarians] make sure to educate themselves about the best edtech tools and will be ready and willing to use them when they [hit the] mainstream,” says Tara Thibault- Edmonds, a school media specialist at Rondout Valley Middle School in New York. Librarians are helpers and collaborators by nature, and they love to share. When a librarian finds a new edtech tool, they share it with colleagues, enthusiastically showing how it can be used to increase student engagement and achievement. “We showcase utilizing educational technology by modeling it in our everyday lessons and the creation of Web pages of resources for all of our constituents,” says Melissa V. Rentchler, a teacher librarian at Marshall Academy of the Arts in California. We asked the same respondents how they share new technology.
While librarians are often at the forefront of technology, they are often overlooked as a resource when making purchasing decisions and driving technology initiatives. This could be a costly mistake for schools. “Librarians are vital to ensuring that faculty can easily apply education technology in the classroom,” says Cherie Bronkar, director of Regional Library at Kent State University, Tuscarawas, Ohio. “They are the link to pushing educational technologies to teachers who don’t have the time or training to use new technologies.” LeAnn Weller, a librarian at the University of New Mexico, Celencia Campus, believes librarians offer solutions and provide the initiative and encouragement that many faculty need to confidently utilize technology in their classrooms.
To be 21st-century college and career ready, students need to know not only how to find information, but how to evaluate, curate, present, and create it. These are all skills that librarians teach, often using the newest technology. “I am proud to be a librarian because I get to do what I love each day. I get to foster a love of reading and literacy in others while teaching students how to be digital learners. Our field is changing and growing and I’m just excited to be working during this change to combine traditional library services with edtech,” says Erin Marone, a library media specialist at Dayton Avenue Elementary School in New York.
When faced with the next technology initiative, school leaders need to not only consider the cost of the program, they should ask their librarians to help them determine the effectiveness and the long-term value of the investment. They also need to have librarians onboard to help spread the word about why any new initiative is vital to increasing student achievement. As Kim Hopper, a school media specialist at John Jay High School in New York says, “[Librarians] need to be more involved in their districts’ advisory committees or selecting process.” Rebecca AndrĂ©, an educational technology director at Temple Beth Am Day School in Miami, Florida, points out “their unique perspective is highly valuable for planning and implementing initiatives. We accomplish much MORE with our librarians!”

Shannon Mersand is a School Media Specialist at Yorktown High School and an Associate Lecturer at UW Stout.

3/26/15 From: Tech&Learning: http://www.techlearning.com/resources/0003/librarians-lead-the-way-in-edtech/69129

4/22/15

School Events in May and June

May 13: Modified Day
*** May 15: Last day to check out books ***
May 25: Memorial Day No School
May 29: Bear Olympics 
June 9: Field day
June 10: Modified Day: Schools out for the summer!

4/13/15

Lesson Plans: 5/11-5/15

K-2: As illustrators students will make a Weather Picture Encyclopedia
1st grade: Checking out and putting away number books
Grade 3-5: Practice Readers Theater

Lesson Plans: 5/4-5/8:

K-2: As illustrators students will make a Weather Picture Encyclopedia
1st grade: Checking out and putting away number books
Grade 3-5: Day 4: Using Google Sheets for a Readers Theater Script

Lesson Plans: 4/27-5/1: Using Google Sheets for a Readers Theater Script

K-2: As illustrators students will make a Weather Picture Encyclopedia
1st grade: Checking out and putting away number books
Grade 3-5: Day 3: Using Google Sheets for a Readers Theater Script

Lesson Plans: 4/20-4/24: Google Sheets: Readers Theater Script

K-2: As illustrators students will make a Weather Picture Encyclopedia: Using the text from the Macmillan/McGraw-Hill Science 1st Grade workbook, I made a 12 page book using Comic Life. I will teach the students how to illustrate each page. Here is an example.
Grade 3-5: Day 2: Using Google Sheets for a Readers Theater Script: Using: Time for Kids science books (16 pgs) (ISBN #: 9780022846435) students will write a Readers Theater Script. Below is an example:




4/3/15

Lesson Plans: 4/13/15-04/17/15: What do you do with an Idea? and Google Sheets

K-5: Read Aloud: What Do You Do With An Idea?
Grade 3-5: Day 1: Using Google Sheets for a Readers Theater Script



2/27/15

Lesson plans: 3/30-4/3: Google Forms and Responses (Google Sheets)

K-2: How to use the site:

at https://www.mystorybook.com/


3-5: Unit: Using the "Responses" (Google Sheets) from Forms

CCSS 6 With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
Model School Library Standards 
4.2.b Select appropriate information technology tools and resources to interact with others for a specific purpose.

Lesson Plans 3/23-3/27: Google Forms and Responses (Google Sheets)

K-2: Book Care
3-5: Unit: Google Forms: and Responses (Google Sheets)
Read Alouds
Title and Copyright page:
CCSS: Reading Standards for Informational Text. 5 Know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
Model School Library Standards 1.3.g Identify the parts of a book 

Lesson Plans 3/16-3/20: Plagiarism

K-5: Plagiarism : Two videos (Yow Elf)
  • Tin Eye
  • Google search: images > Search Tools > Usage rights > Labeled for reuse
  • Inspired Works: Old MacDonald Had A Farm >  E-I-E-I-O! How Old MacDonald Got His Farm with a Little Help From a Hen written by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Matthew Myers
CCSS: 8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources.
Model School Library Standards 
1.3.aIdentify and locate multiple sources of information that provide a broad view of research topics and questions (e.g., books, reference materials, online sources, periodicals).

Lesson Plans: 3/9-3/13: Google Forms and Responses (Google Sheets) and Atlas and Almanacs

K-2: Atlas and Almanacs: Read aloud: Library Mouse A World to Explore and 1st grade: Sorting E books
3-5: Unit: Google Forms and Responses (Google Sheets)

CCSS 6 With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.
Model School Library Standards 
3.3.b Use digital or graphic tools to support a presentation.
4.2.b Select appropriate information technology tools and resources to interact with others for a specific purpose.

Lesson Plans 3/2-3/6: Dictionary, Encyclopedia and Thesaurus / Atlas and Almanacs

K-2: Dictionary, Encyclopedia and Thesauru: Read Aloud: Mr Wiggle Looks for Answers
3-5 Review: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Thesaurus, Atlas and Almanacs

CCSS: 5 Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
Model School Library Standards 
1.3.j Use guide words to locate information in a reference book. 1.3.k Perform a key word search of a topic using an approved search engine or database. 1.3.n Use print or digital indexes, or both, to locate articles in an encyclopedia. 1.3.p Locate information in text by using the organizational parts of a book in print or digital format (e.g., title,  table of contents, chapter headings, glossary, author notes, dedication, index).

2/15/15

Learning Google Classroom

"Classroom lets you communicate with your classes and easily share assignments, materials, and messages."

Start by asking Mr Politzer to add you as a Teacher, afterwards signing in at https://classroom.google.com/h

I drew this picture of a "Google Classroom" on Office's Paint, however now realized I needed to go back and add Chromebooks. On Monday I am going to learn Google Classroom.

2/14/15

My Google Classroom with Chromebooks (2:1)


Lesson Plans: 2/23-2/27: Dictionary and Google Slides

3rd-5th: Google Slides
Kinder-2nd: Reading Nonfiction: Useing a Dictionary

Model School Library Standards: Use digital or graphic tools to support a presentation. Select appropriate information technology tools and resources to interact with others for a specific purpose.

CCSS: Writing Standards 6: With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.


https://prezi.com/signup/public/

2/13/15

Lesson Plans: 2/16-2/20: Index and Google Slides

3rd-5th: Google Slides
Kinder-2nd: Reading Nonfiction: Index

How to get to your Google Drive 
  1. Log into Google Chromebook
    1. At other computers log into your email account.
  2. Open your Apps (at bottom of screen on left)
    1. On email screen, it is at the top of screen on right.
  3. Click on Google Drive
  4. Double Click on your presentation

Model School Library Standards: Use digital or graphic tools to support a presentation. Select appropriate information technology tools and resources to interact with others for a specific purpose.
CCSS: Writing Standards 6: With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

Lesson Plans: 2/9-2/13: Glossary and Google Slides

3rd-5th: Google Slides
Kinder-2nd: Reading Nonfiction: Glossary
Friday 1-2 also need Reading Nonfiction: Table of Contents (lockdown)


Model School Library Standards: Use digital or graphic tools to support a presentation. Select appropriate information technology tools and resources to interact with others for a specific purpose.
CCSS: Writing Standards 6: With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

2/12/15

We learned a lot and had a great time. I cannot wait for the next conference. Maybe CUE 2015 Fall Conference, October 23 - 24, in the Napa Valley, CA

Day 4: Sunday: CSLA Conference

  • Grant Writing and Fundraising for Your School Library by Sue Heraper. This was most helpful. The biggest tip was to get a folder all set up at the beginning of the year so you can apply at any time.

Day 3: Saturday: CSLA Conference

  • Librarian without a Library by Leigh Ann McCready. She talked about what happens to a school library when a new one is being built and weeding. Good ideas for obsolete books: 1. Bookmarks for weeded books.  2. Goodwill takes hardcover books.
  • The Future of digital and Information Literacy by Rosemarie Bernier. Look into Tech training with Google and community colleges. I will share her PFD as soon as I get a copy (I took notes on my hardcopy).
  • CCSS Literacy Lessons Hidden in Library Books by Patricia Ohanian. This was the best session of the conference! She teaches at Addison ES in Palo Alto, Ca and with come a speak at schools in the Bay area. 
  • Connecting Families: Rethinking Education About Parenting in a Digital Age by Kelley Mendoza from Common Sense Education (branch of CSM). She shared idea about how to run parent nights.
  • A Journey into Inquiry: Using Children's Books to Teach Science by Julie Andreacchi. I will share her PowerPoint as soon as I get a copy.

2/6/15

Day 2: Friday: CSLA Conference

If you ever get a chance to hear Shannon McClintock Miller take it!

A. Early Bird Session:
  • There's a Digital Tool for That! Ten Creative Tools and Projects for Your Library and Classroom by Shannon McClintock Miller. I will be placing these links in my Shelf Elf Toolbox. You can go to her Blog The Library Voice at http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com/ 
B. Exhibitors Learning Sessions:
  • California PBS LearningMedia FREE PBS video and more. http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/ “Why Register? Save, download and share resources. Discover local content. Access storyboard, quiz maker and lesson builder tools. Participate in exclusive events, sweepstakes and giveaways.” Here are some math problems: http://mathmess.ideastream.org/
  •  California Streaming: http://www.californiastreaming.org/ Cost 0.70 cents per student. Request a free trial. Very cool tools and you are able to make clips of these videos.
  • Perma-Bound showed us how to find holes in our collections.
C. My New Tool Box: I added a page to my Blog named "Shelf Elf Toolbox", I will be adding the links covered at the conference there.

C. Librarian Notes:
  • Keep post-cards at front desk with Links and Passwords for parents, teachers, and students.
  • Perma-Bound: Nonfiction CCSS books and ebooks. Tools that look at collection.

Day 1: Thursday: CSLA Conference

A. My first class was "Flipping Your Library" by Michele Luthala (2 hours)
Flipping Applications
10. eContent: eBooks and Web sites, (I wonder if there is an app for Follett Shelf)
9. Curation: Pearltrees http://www.pearltrees.com/
8. Close: Subtext (ipad only) http://goo.gl/kJIhTX
7. Student Response System: Socrative http://www.socrative.com/ Great for Chromebooks
6. Course Management: Google Classroom http://goo.gl/OQG1na  I want to try this!
5. Communication: Google Voice: http://goo.gl/aSdHKp and Twitter
4. Blogging: Blogger (yeah!) https://www.blogger.com
3. Collection delivery: Destiny Library Manager
2. Video Instruction: Screenflow, AirServer, Reflector
1. Cloud Computing: Google Drive

B. My second class was "A Deeper Dive into the new ELA/ELD Framework K-12" by Renee Ousley-Swank (2 hours). This was very complex workshop. My aha moment was when I realized I could combine the ELA/ELD standards with the library standards and reach more students. The SFUSD has combined the CCSS, ELA/ELD, and the Library standards. We will contact them and see if we can get a copy of their work.

C. Today I talked to many reps... 

I cannot wait to learn more about PBS Learning Media California http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/ which is FREE. I will be attending workshops with them on Friday and Saturday.

I am also interested in California Streaming  http://www.californiastreaming.org/ however it is fee based at 0.70 cents per student per year.

2/1/15

CSLA Conference starts 2/5/15




The California School Library Association is an organization of teacher librarians, classroom teachers, paraprofessionals, district and county coordinators of curriculum, media and technology, and others committed to enriching student learning through school libraries.

How many books have we read this year?

ImageChef.com - Get codes for Facebook, Hi5, MySpace and more

1/27/15

1/23/15

"Makers" Projector Stand for a Chromebook, Laptop, or Tablet



I took apart an old print ordering kiosks stand to make this projector stand. The shelf that holds the projector is the insides of the old monitor. To keep small fingers and heads safe from the edges of the projector shelf, I used an old hose from a CPAP machine. 






1/21/15

Connecting a Chromebook with HDMI to projector with only VGA

I wanted to connect a Chromebook (Acer C720) to an old projector, however the Chromebook only had HDMI and the projector only had VGA, so I bought a HDMI Male to VGA Female Video Converter Adapter for $11.00 (Amazon). It did not work. I tried four different projectors.  I searched online for hints of what I could do or use to make this work, and found nothing helpful. I was ready to return the adapter, when I tried plugging in the Chromebook to the charger and POP it worked. I tested all four projectors and they all worked.  The Chromebook does not have enough battery juice to do the conversion from HDMI digital signal to VGA analog signal; you have to plug it in to an outlet!
PS: In NHUSD at the K-5 level, you have to be in a "staff" account to use mirroring. 

Here is a tip from Stephen Politzer:
There are two types of HDMI to VGA adapters: passive (no power boost) and active (USB power boost). The adapter you tried is passive. I had an active one at some point but can't find it. What it does is connect the HDMI and VGA AND adds an additional USB power cable to provide more power to the adapter. I suggest trying one of these. 

1/12/15

Lesson Plans: 2/2-2/6: Messy week

Monday: 3rd-5th: Start Google Slides, Kinder-2nd: Reading Nonfiction: Index (will miss class on 2/16)
Tuesday: 2-5 CYRM Books, K-1: Read alouds
Wednesday classes: Same as last week
Th - Fri: Sub Plans: 2-5 Working on Keyboarding, K-1: Read alouds

1/9/15

Lesson Plans 1/26-1/30: Reading Nonfiction: Table of Contents

3rd-5th: Reading Nonfiction: Glossary, Index, and Table of Contents
Kinder-2nd: Reading Nonfiction: Table of Contents



Model School Library Standards: Understand and respond to nonfiction. CCSS: Reading Standards for Informational Text Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. Activate prior knowledge related to the information and events a texts. Use illustrations and context to make predictions about a text.

1/8/15

Lesson Plans: 1/19-1/23: Reading Nonfiction: Graphics

K-5th: Unit: Reading Nonfiction: Graphics
Reference: Read and Succeed: Comprehension. Shell Education, 2010.
Presentations at http://yow510.blogspot.com


Model School Library Standards: Understand and respond to nonfiction. CCSS: Reading Standards for Informational Text Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. Activate prior knowledge related to the information and events a texts. Use illustrations and context to make predictions about a text.

Lesson Plans 1/12-1/16: Reading Nonfiction: Typeface and Captions

K-5th: Unit: Reading Nonfiction: Typeface and Captions
Reference: Read and Succeed: Comprehension. Shell Education, 2010.
Presentations at http://yow510.blogspot.com

Model School Library Standards: Understand and respond to nonfiction. CCSS: Reading Standards for Informational Text Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. Activate prior knowledge related to the information and events a texts. Use illustrations and context to make predictions about a text.